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Project Servator - Together, we've got it covered

Frequently asked questions

What does Servator mean?

Servator is Latin for watcher, observer, or preserver.
 

What is hostile reconnaissance?  

Hostile reconnaissance is the purposeful observation of people, places, vehicles and locations with the intention of collecting information to inform the planning of a hostile act against a target. Project Servator is designed to counter this activity.
 

When did Project Servator start?

The City of London Police was the first police force to introduce Project Servator deployments, in February 2014. This followed several years of planning and development with the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI).
 

Who else uses Project Servator?

Project Servator is now being rolled out by police forces across the United Kingdom. Currently, a total of 18 police forces, including Royal Gibraltar Police, are using Project Servator to complement their existing policing tactics to disrupt a range of criminal activity, including terrorism.
 

What does the Project Servator logo represent?

The Project Servator logo depicts a police officer, police dog, and three other people, which could represent a member of the public, a security officer, or member of retail staff. This portrays the collaborative ethos behind Project Servator, and the use of different police assets

Why does the City of London Police use Project Servator?

We are dedicated to protecting our communities. We continually adapt and change our tactics in order to deter criminals and those who threaten our safety and security. Our focus will always be on keeping people safe.
 

Does this mean that the police are anticipating a terrorist attack?

No. We know that Project Servator enhances how we protect our communities from a wide range of crime, including terrorism.
 
Project Servator has been developed over several years and a number of police forces have adopted this policing tactic since 2014. Although it is not a response to a specific threat, the threat to the UK from international terrorism is SEVERE, meaning an attack is highly likely.
 
The tragic events in London and Manchester in 2017, and further afield, remind us that attacks can happen at any time or place without warning. This means we all have to remain alert and vigilant when going about our daily lives.
 
Cooperation between the public, commercial organisations, partners and the police remains the greatest advantage in tackling the challenge the UK faces from terrorism and, in light of the significant threat level, this cooperation is more important than ever before.
 
Project Servator plays an important role in encouraging everyone to work together to make the UK an uninviting target for criminals and terrorists. It aims to disrupt a range of criminal activity, including terrorism, while providing a reassuring presence for the public.

Will this affect my business?

We have carefully designed and tested the Project Servator tactics to reassure the public as well as disrupt a range of criminal activity, including terrorism. However, your help is key and you have a very important role to play, by helping us reassure customers and visitors directly. 

Telling your staff and customers about what to expect will provide reassurance that these measures are for their safety and not as a result of an increase in threat. If you have any concerns regarding the project or would like to discuss it further, please call us on 020 7601 2452 or email Project.Servator@cityoflondon.police.uk
 

What should I tell my staff

 
Project Servator is:
 
  • designed to protect the City and everyone who works, lives and visits here.
  • Comprises a range of tactics to disrupt a range of criminal activity.
  • highly visible but unpredictable, occurring regularly around key parts of the City. They can happen at any time.
  • reliant on your support. Police officers will visit to let you know more and explain how you can help.
 
They should report anything that doesn’t feel right immediately. They should tell a police officer or member of security staff, or call 101. In an emergency, always call 999.
 

What should I tell my customers?

 
We’re supporting Project Servator, which is designed to help protect the City. It is:
  • designed to disrupt criminal activity, including terrorism
  • unpredictable and patrols can happen anywhere and at any time
  • they have a vital role to play in reporting anything that doesn’t feel right. Tell a police officer or member of staff, or call 101. In an emergency, always call 999.

 How else can I help or be involved?

We cannot stress enough how much businesses can help by telling your staff and customers about Project Servator. If we work together as a community, together we’ve got security covered. Your support by displaying posters and by reporting any suspicious activity to us immediately is vital in helping us to keep the City safe for everyone
 

You said these methods are effective in disrupting criminal activity. What evidence do you have for this?

Project Servator has been successful in gathering intelligence that has assisted Counter Terrorism Units across the UK in investigating and preventing acts of terror. It has resulted in arrests for a multitude of offences and is responsible for removing firearms, knives and drugs from the streets.
 
Research shows that over a third of stops carried out by Project Servator officers lead to an outcome, such as an arrest or caution. In some police forces, this has risen to over three quarters or stops carried out as part of Project Servator leading to an outcome, such as an arrest or caution. Traditionally, less than one in five random stops lead to an outcome, such as an arrest or caution.
 

Your feedback

If you have any feedback or want to discuss Project Servator with us please call us on 020 7601 2452 or email Project.Servator@cityoflondon.police.uk​​


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